Looking To Join?

Are you up for fun, adventure, incredible experiences and making new friends? Are you looking for something to give you the edge in life? Then welcome to the Air Cadet Organisation (ACO). Better known as the 'Air Cadets', we’re a UK-wide cadet force with more than 40,000 members aged between 12 (year 8) and 18 years.

Our Aims

Where Air Cadets Can Take You

The Founding of the Air Cadets

75 Years of Air Cadets

In 1859 several schools around the country began forming armed, uniformed units of adults and older boys with the purpose of protecting Britain in the event of an attack from overseas.

The Second World War was on the horizon and if aircraft were to be used as a major combat strength, then the RAF would need a serious amount of combat-ready pilots.

Air Commodore J A Chamier, now known as the father of the Air Cadet Organisation was determined to get British people aware of the RAF and its vital role in any future war. He wanted to establish an air cadet corps, encouraging young people to consider a career in aviation.

So, in 1938 the Air Defence Cadet Corps (ADCC) was founded,by the end of the war, in just 7 years since the formation of the ADCC, almost 100,000 cadets had joined the RAF.

February 1941 the Air Training Corps was officially established with King George VI as the Air Commodore-in-Chief.The organisation has gone from strength to strength over the last few decades. Girls were able to join from the early 1980s.

The RAF Air Cadets is delighted to announce that its history will be featured in a new exhibition at the RAF Museum Hendon, London opening on February 7 2016.

Officers have been working closely with the museum’s team to produce a display chronicling the exciting story of the Air Training Corps, from 1941 when it was established, right through to the very latest developments.

The exhibition is primarily aimed at visitors who know little or nothing about the history of the RAF Air Cadets*.

Together with a plethora of other anniversary events across the UK to mark the organisation’s 75th year it is intended to raise public awareness of what is one of the finest national voluntary youth organisations in the world.

  • Promote and encourage a practical interest in aviation and the Royal Air Force among young people
  • Provide training which will be useful in the Services and civilian life
  • Encourage the spirit of adventure and develop qualities of leadership and good citizenship

 

And there's one more important thing - it's a lot of fun!

We are not a recruiting organisation for the RAF but if you're thinking about a Service career, cadet membership will put you ahead of the competition. Many cadets go on to great success in the RAF (and the other Services).

 

Around 40% of officers and 50% of all aircrew (including pilots, navigators and engineers) in the RAF now are ex-cadets. Research shows that they do better in basic training and stay in the Service longer than their colleagues. Likewise, if you chose a civilian career our research proves you can go on the great things…

 

employers just love the skills and experience that air cadets offer.

In 1859 several schools around the country began forming armed, uniformed units of adults and older boys with the purpose of protecting Britain in the event of an attack from overseas.

The Second World War was on the horizon and if aircraft were to be used as a major combat strength, then the RAF would need a serious amount of combat-ready pilots

Air Commodore J A Chamier, now known as the father of the Air Cadet Organisation was determined to get British people aware of the RAF and its vital role in any future war. He wanted to establish an air cadet corps, encouraging young people to consider a career in aviation.

So, in 1938 the Air Defence Cadet Corps (ADCC) was founded

,by the end of the war, in just 7 years since the formation of the ADCC, almost 100,000 cadets had joined the RAF.

February 1941 the Air Training Corps was officially established with King George VI as the Air Commodore-in-Chief.The organisation has gone from strength to strength over the last few decades. Girls were able to join from the early 1980s.

The RAF Air Cadets is delighted to announce that its history will be featured in a new exhibition at the RAF Museum Hendon, London opening on February 7 next year (2016).

Officers have been working closely with the museum’s team to produce a display chronicling the exciting story of the Air Training Corps, from 1941 when it was established, right through to the very latest developments.

The exhibition is primarily aimed at visitors who know little or nothing about the history of the RAF Air Cadets*.

Together with a plethora of other anniversary events across the UK to mark the organisation’s 75th year it is intended to raise public awareness of what is one of the finest national voluntary youth organisations in the world.